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The Urban Farm Podcast with Greg Peterson

Welcome to The Urban Farm Podcast, your partner in the Grow Your Own Food revolution! This audio only podcast features special guests like Jason Mraz, Lisa Steele, and Kari Spencer as we discuss the art and value of growing food in urban areas. We'll explore topics such as urban beekeeping and chicken farming, permaculture, successful composting, monetizing your farm, and much more! Each episode will bring you tips and tricks on how to overcome common challenges, opportunities to learn from the experience of people just like you, and plenty of resources to ensure you're informed, equipped, and empowered to participate more mindfully in your local food system... and to have a great time doing it!
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The Urban Farm Podcast with Greg Peterson
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Visit our podcast page here to find photos, links and more information on this podcast as well as each of our other guest interviews.

Nov 16, 2019

Foraging and harvesting edible plants.

In This Podcast: Explore the abundance of the desert with Cactus Kelly Athena. Normally a teacher and wild desert cuisine harvester, Kelly will open your eyes to ways you could be eating the native plants in your area or harvesting them and selling to local chefs and restaurants. After this episode, you'll be harvesting your neighborhood trees to try desert edamame, mesquite flour, nopales, and prickly pear! Also, she explains the environmental and social benefits of hyperlocal cuisine.

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Kelly grew up loving nature in Northern California and moved to Phoenix in 1986. She holds a Master's Degree in Music and Photography, and is a Master Gardener of Maricopa County. She was named Arizona Photographer of the year in 2000, and especially enjoys photographing nature. Five years ago, she began hosting plant walks to help people learn to identify and sustainably harvest wild plants. Then she was dubbed “Cactus Kelly.” Kelly is especially interested in desert bean trees such as the Palo Verde, Mesquite, and Ironwood trees as well as edible cacti and weeds. She harvests wild desert cuisine for restaurants and chefs in the area, makes prickly pear juice and powder, and teaches desert foraging in schools and at the Desert Botanical Garden.  

Visit www.urbanfarm.org/cactuskelly for the show notes on this episode, and access to our full podcast library!

494: Kelly Athena on Wild Desert Cuisine.

Nov 12, 2019

Researching how urban farmers can increase the performance of our landscapes.

In This Podcast: If the term active carbon sequestration has you picturing scientists in hazmat suits, you aren’t alone! Returning guest Scott Murray shares how to harness the power of nature and use home landscaping to reduce carbon in the environment. Listen in for an easy to understand explanation of the impact of carbon on our global environment, how capturing it helps the growth of our plants and trees, and what we can do right now to create microsystems that reduce your carbon output.

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Scott  has 46 years of organic agricultural production experience in the United States and Mexico. He has a multitude of experience with conservation, food production, and environmental leadership—including serving as an elected California Conservation official for the last 27 years. Scott also specializes in farmland preservation projects utilizing Smart Growth Principles. These days he does farm creation and consulting as his primary work, including work on a farm growing coffee in Southern California which had its first harvest and sold out in one day for $796 a pound. 

Visit www.urbanfarm.org/activecarbon for the show notes on this episode, and access to our full podcast library!

493: Scott Murray on Active Carbon Sequestration

Nov 9, 2019

Working with military vets to share
urban farming skills.

In This Podcast: AOVS Urban Farm is much more than CSA and Farmers Market produce. The farm is home to veterans, and Christopher Peterson discusses the immense benefits for the veterans who work and walk through the farm. This unique model has its challenges, and he shares how they planned a regenerative, ADA accessible space that produces food, but also acts as landscaping for the on-site residents. Listen in to learn about this unique approach to helping our veterans and the surrounding community! 

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Christopher works as the Farm Manager at AOVS Urban Farm, a 2-acre Urban Farm and Gardens in South Memphis serving economically disadvantaged veterans who have suffered from physical and/or mental health conditions. Prior to this position, he ran Loch Holland Farm, a small, sustainable livestock farm focusing on multi-species rotational grazing and has worked on several other small, sustainable farms in the Memphis area.  

Christopher also previously served as Executive Director for GrowMemphis (now a program of Memphis Tilth) and has consulted on various other Mid-south food initiatives. In addition to food work, he holds an MA in Human Value and Global Ethics and continues to teach locally as an adjunct professor in Philosophy and Anthropology.  

Visit www.urbanfarm.org/aovs for the show notes on this episode, and access to our full podcast library!

492: Christopher Peterson on
Urban Farming with Vets

Nov 5, 2019

 Using the space above planters to the best advantage. 

In This Podcast: Sometimes it just doesn't feel like we have enough space in our gardens! Returning guest, Jason Johns, shares his solution that increased the yield per square foot from his garden, different styles of vertical gardens, and design tips. He also recommends his favorite plants and how to customize the soil and watering schedule when you are planting upward. Listen in for details on how to win his newest book to help you start creating your own vertical garden.

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Jason is the author of Vertical Gardening: A Complete Guide to Growing Food, Herbs, and Flowers in Small Spaces, as well as 17 other gardening books on everything from greenhouse gardening to growing giant pumpkins. 

Jason is passionate about gardening, having grown his own produce for over twenty years.  He started with a second-hand greenhouse, an 8’ by 6’ patch of his mother’s garden, and far too many tomato plants.   

Visit www.urbanfarm.org/vertical for the show notes on this episode, and access to our full podcast library!

491: Jason Johns on Vertical Gardening

Nov 2, 2019

Admiring the most commonly pickled vegetable in all its varieties.

In This Podcast: Do you know the difference between a cucumber and a cucumber melon? Neither did Jay Tracy, but a conversation with a desert gardening guru helped him discover this tasty, drought-tolerant plant that is easy to grow in hot climates. Learn all about how to grow cucumber melons, how he avoids cross-pollination, and why landrace varieties are more resilient. Jay also shares some of his favorite varieties, his secrets for pre-sprouting vs direct seeding, and how to win some seeds!

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Jay began gardening in 2006 in Tucson Arizona, then moved to Fairfield, California for cooler weather and health reasons. In Fairfield, he has three large garden beds - one at home, two at nearby friends’ houses - and one greenhouse. His blog Scientificgardener.com is where he records his experiments and discusses his love of gardening.  

Early in his gardening life he found an interest in growing cucumbers and has experimented with common and not-so-common varieties, and with each success, he expands to even more rare varieties. Over time this hobby has expanded to a small business known as the Cucumber Shop

Visit www.urbanfarm.org/cucumbershop for the show notes on this episode, and access to our full podcast library!

490: Jay Tracy on Cucumber Melons.

Oct 29, 2019

Changing the world by reclaiming nutrients lost from our bodies.

In This Podcast: What is your first thought when you think of using urine as fertilizer? Abraham Noe-Hays from the Rich Earth Institute may change your mind. Urine contains nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium, all things that we look for in a fertilizer. They create pollution in our wastewater system, but when added to the agricultural cycle they benefit our plants. Listen in and learn about urine diversion, and you'll honestly start to contemplate if you should begin peeing in your yard!

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Abraham is the Research Director of the Rich Earth Institute. He coordinates multidisciplinary research and demonstration efforts involving farmers, scientists, planners, and volunteer participants (aka "urine donors"), with the goal of developing tools to allow other communities to start recycling urine. A lifelong resident of Vermont, he has used alternative sanitation systems since 1976, and has been academically and professionally involved in their development since 2000. 

The Rich Earth Institute is an organization operating the nation’s first community-scale urine recycling program. This program converts human urine into fertilizer for use on local farms. The initiative saves water, prevents pollution, and supports sustainable agriculture by turning a universal waste product into a valuable resource.  

Visit www.urbanfarm.org/peecycling for the show notes on this episode, and access to our full podcast library!

489: Abraham Noe-Hays on Fertilizer from Urine

 

Oct 26, 2019

Documenting the many unique aspects in seed varieties.

In This Podcast: Returning podcast guest, Chris Smith, updates us on his Okra Trials, everything he learned, and how they determined the best variety of okra out of over 60 contestants! He also shares how The Utopian Seed Project is focusing on bringing seed and food diversity to the south. They are currently testing southern crops such as cowpeas, heritage beans, corn, and groundnuts. Listen in to learn about growing tropical perennials in the south, open-sourced seeds, and much more!

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Chris is an author, garden blog writer, and homesteading consultant. In 2018 while writing his book The Whole Okra, he grew out 76 different varieties of okra as research.  In many ways, this research fed The Utopian Seed Project to take root and grow. 

Based in Asheville, NC, the Utopian Seed Project is a hands-in-the-earth organization committed to research trials on crop varieties in the Southeast to support diversity in food and farming. They are working towards an overarching vision to support food security in the face of climate change through diverse and regenerative agriculture. 

Visit www.urbanfarm.org/utopianseed for the show notes on this episode, and access to our full podcast library!

488: Chris Smith about Saving Seed Diversity

Oct 22, 2019

Bonus Episode 31: Seed Saving Class September 2019

A chat with an expert on Seeds. 

In This Bonus Podcast: This is the September 2019 episode of a live Seed Saving Class discussing genetic modification, the current advances, what that means for our food, the truth behind the scientific studies, hand pollination, and so much more.

There is always a bounty of information available in conversations with Bill McDorman.

Join the class! Register anytime for the next event.
Register Here for the Seed Saving Class with Live Q&A
Bio paragraphs (left justified)

Visit www.urbanfarm.org/bonus31 for the show notes on this bonus episode, and access to our full podcast library!

Oct 19, 2019

Discovering the wonders of harvesting native and urban trees, weeds, and cacti.

In This Podcast: What would you eat if all the grocery stores in your area closed? Peggy Sorensen has found her answer in the native trees, shrubs, weeds, and cacti of the southwest! Hear how she got into foraging edible desert plants, which southwest plants are her favorite to harvest, and some of the ways to process and prepare them. If you've ever wondered about making your own prickly pear juice, mesquite flour, purslane pickles, or mallow chips, you'll love this intro to wild foods!

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Peggy is a wild-foods enthusiast and forager who enjoys helping people discover the edible plants, trees, and weeds that grow all around us but typically are not recognized as food.   

She gives workshops and plant walks around the Phoenix area and not only brings in samples of the plants to see, touch and taste but she also likes to turn them into tasty treats in order to provide a well-rounded experience.  

She has become known for her mallow chips, purslane pickles, prickly pear lemonade as well as mesquite nectar and truffles.   

Peggy is also a gardener, an herbalist and a board member of the AZ Herb Association.   

Visit www.urbanfarm.org/desertkitchen for the show notes on this episode, and access to our full podcast library!

487: Peggy Sorensen on Foraging Edible Plants in the Desert

 

Oct 15, 2019

Honoring a family heritage or nurturing neighbors.

In This Podcast: Most people in Arizona are familiar with Hickman's eggs, but there is so much more to this family-run business than eggs! Clint Hickman shared with us the evolution of egg farming, and how his family business grew enough to feed Phoenix. He also explains all the side businesses that came out of egg farming: organic fertilizer, recycling programs, and animal feed. They even formed a mutually beneficial program with local prisons that gives farm-work-release inmates a leg up.

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Clint is the Vice President of Sales and Marketing for Hickman’s Family Farms, the largest egg company in the Southwest United States and one of the top 20 nationwide. Truly family-run, Clint and his siblings have built up the business that his grandmother founded.  A graduate of the University of Arizona, he oversees the vast network of partners that Hickman’s maintains, and guides the company’s marketing efforts.   

While growing up, Clint was inspired by how his grandparents treated friends and neighbors. From that, he now makes sure that programs are provided to help relieve hunger, support education, and promote extensive and ongoing training in the communities that Hickman brands are welcomed. 

Visit www.urbanfarm.org/hickmanseggs for the show notes on this episode, and access to our full podcast library!

486: Clint Hickman on Building Community Sustainability

Oct 12, 2019

Creating a full circle food system that connects family and community.

In This Podcast: Wholistic living has taken on a whole new meaning for Jolene Kuty! Through learning about health, she went from eating cheese infused hot dogs to working as a chiropractic physician surrounded by her half-acre urban farm. She created a full circle system using compost, chickens, mealworms, and contributions from neighbors. Hear how she engages her kids and educates with no element overlooked as she creates a thriving space that allows her to get outside and engage with the world.

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Chiropractic physician and health educator, Dr. Jolene Kuty, built an idyllic sustainable urban farm as a role model for her patients and her family.  Her home and on-site chiropractic office is surrounded by 800 sq. ft. of raised organic vegetable gardens and over 20 Urban Farm fruit trees. They live, work, and play on a half-acre in the city where their five children swing beside seedlings and are surrounded by fresh growing fruit. They eat farm-to-table sharing recipes and inspiration with all who visit. 

Visit www.urbanfarm.org/kuty for the show notes on this episode, and access to our full podcast library!

485: Jolene Kuty on Abundant Holistic Harvests

Oct 8, 2019

Helping others understand and create food forests.

In This Podcast: Eco-edible landscaping sounds like a cool new method, but it incorporates many of the tried and true methods of permaculture. Kristie Kapp educates on building a food forest and how to incorporate 7 layers, supporting plants, mineral accumulators, and beneficial insects. She teaches stacking plant functions and how to build the ideal soil for your food forest in just one year. Listen in to learn these principles and how to start creating regenerative, resilient ecosystems. 

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Kristie is the Founder and Executive Director of Resilient Roots. She has a master's in ecology from Yale School of Environmental Studies and over twenty years of farming experience. She decided to merge the two professions, completed a permaculture landscape design program, and has been designing landscapes since 2014.   

Resilient Roots is a non-profit organization whose mission is to educate and promote awareness about permaculture landscapes that are primarily edible and guided by ecological principles. They empower people to grow their own food in a manner that is sustainable and uses local resources.   

Visit www.urbanfarm.org/resilientroots for the show notes on this episode, and access to our full podcast library!

484: Kristie Kapp on Eco-edible landscaping

Oct 5, 2019

Moving from dreaming about it, to doing what it takes to grow a farm.

In This Podcast: How does an adventurous spirit, practicing yoga and following your intuition lead someone to start a farm? As Tiffany Panaccione learned, those experiences teach you to follow your heart and try new things! Listen in to learn how she plans to turn her dream of farming into a profitable business. She discusses her plans for her first crop, and how she plans to build a customer base. Healthy soil, drip tape, and saving seeds are all part of the strategy she discusses.

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Tiff is a Phoenix native with a gypsy soul. Her self-healing journey has sailed her around the world and right back home to her roots. With a strong craving and an inner calling to go deep within herself and simultaneously the dirt, she is now listening, learning, discovering, and planning to cultivate the gifts of the Sonoran Desert. After all, she wonders… is it really worth doing the “hard work” if it isn’t your heart’s work? 

Visit www.urbanfarm.org/heartworkfarms for the show notes on this episode, and access to our full podcast library!

483: Tiffany Panaccione on Starting an Urban Farm Business

Oct 1, 2019

Enhancing our connection to the earth and each other.

In This Podcast: Learning about permaculture can be life changing, and Michael Gettens shares about his experience taking a permaculture design course, how to take on a production mindset instead of simply consuming resources, and how the current food system is degenerative instead of regenerative. Rainwater harvesting, sectors, zones, and solar cooking are all topics in this chat about working with the earth to connect with it and each other.

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Michael is a Permaculture student inspired by the diversity of plants and animals who call the Sonoran Desert home. Growing up in New Jersey, his Italian mother sparked an interest in nutrition, and thus the importance of fresh, local ingredients began his gardening journey. When he moved across the country in 2014 to Arizona, the unique climate presented an obvious focus on water to ensure a good harvest.  

Michael took his first Permaculture Design Course in the Fall of 2017, led by Dan Dorsey - which guided him to a concentration in rainwater harvesting, and a goal to discover low-tech solutions that provide basic human needs. His current position at Galaxy Gardens includes irrigation maintenance, rain garden design, and planting services. 

Visit www.urbanfarm.org/michaelg for the show notes on this episode, and access to our full podcast library!

482: Michael Gettens on Evolving Lifestyles in a Changing World

 

Sep 28, 2019

Building soil quality through carbon management.

In This Podcast: Biochar can improve your soil and help the environment at the same time! We visited with Dr. Rivka Fidel from the University of Arizona to learn all about biochar and carbon farming. Listen in for how you can make it, use it, and the science behind adding it to your compost. She also shares about her journey into the field of sustainable agriculture, why it's important for our future to create a carbon negative world, and highlights in carbon farming.

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Dr. Rivka Fidel is currently an Assistant Professor of Practice at the Department Environmental Science, University of AZ, teaching introductory level classes in Soil Science and Critical Zone Science. She received her PhD in Soil Science from Iowa State University and her B.S. in Environmental Science from Union College. Her research is in soil carbon and nitrogen cycling, specifically examining the efficacy of biochar for improving soil quality and mitigating climate change.

Visit www.urbanfarm.org/rivka for the show notes on this episode, and access to our full podcast library!

481: Rivka Fidel on Biochar and Carbon Farming

Sep 24, 2019

Bonus Episode 30: Seed Saving Class August 2019. 

A chat with an expert on Seeds. 

In This Bonus Podcast: Once again we join a conversation with Bill McDorman and Greg Peterson to learn about growing from seed, growing for seed, and why our seeds are so important in these changing times.

This is the replay of the August 2019 Seed Saving Class 
In this class, he covers the Art of Seed Saving, and of course a few more things as well.

Join the class! Register anytime for the next event.
Register Here for the Seed Saving Class with Live Q&A

Go to www.urbanfarm.org/bonus30 for more information and links on this bonus podcast, and to find our other great guests.

Sep 21, 2019

Experimenting with living off existing food sources for difficult times.

In This Podcast: We followed up with Kevin Espiritu to hear the results of his Apocalypse Survival Challenge. Could you survive for a whole month only eating what you grow, fish, barter, or forage? Hear how Kevin used his 200 square foot gardening space, community foodscapes, and trade - to nourish himself for an entire month. He gets specific on identifying what foods to grow in the 90 days prior to the challenge, how he added protein using fishing and plants, and his surprising takeaways.

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His business Epic Gardening began as a way for Kevin to present gardening information in a more modern, updated way to friends and family. First came the website. Followed by YouTube, a daily podcast, and finally his social media presence on Instagram, and Facebook.  Kevin is the author of Field Guide to Urban Gardening from our friends at Quarto Publishing.  Like Greg, Kevin was a presenter on the recent Superfood Summit and loves to share gardening knowledge. 

Visit www.urbanfarm.org/epicchallenge  for the show notes on this episode, and access to our full podcast library!

480: Kevin Espiritu on his Apocalypse Grow Survival Challenge

 

Sep 17, 2019

How to get creative with 80 pounds of fruit.

In This Podcast: We are back with returning guest and team member, Katie Fiore to talk about getting creative when your yard gives you an excess of food. While many people fear abundance, she embraces the creativity it allows and shares a different way to look at cooking with apples in both the long and short term. You’ll also learn about the concept of a local "Cool Tool" community shed for lesser-used harvest tools, as well as saving seeds and succession planting for seasonal abundance. 

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Katie  is an Arizona native who spent most of her life thinking she had a brown thumb. Five years ago, her first successful attempt at growing food was herbs grown in wine barrels. Since then she has become an Urban Farm junkie. In Spring 2018 she planted 15 fruit trees and bushes in the backyard and has started adding a few raised beds to her garden. Now, she is up to 21 fruit trees on her property, all with sweet potatoes planted under them.  

A career change last summer has given her the time to pursue a healthier, lower stress life with her new husband Mark. She is currently following her dreams of blogging about all her adventures, nurturing her backyard food forest, and helping GrowPHX Collaborative establish a Speakers Bureau in Arizona. 

Visit www.urbanfarm.org/80pounds for the show notes on this episode, and access to our full podcast library!

479: Katie Fiore on Apple Abundance.

Sep 14, 2019

Transforming ordinary spaces into beautiful, food-producing landscapes.

In This Podcast: Entering college without much direction, a life-changing experience in Paraguay helped Matt Lebon find his place in the global food system. Now, he runs a custom foodscaping company making spaces beautiful and edible. He share about hands-on education in permaculture and farm school as well the magical food moments his company helps to create. He gives insight into how gardens and orchards connect people to nature and how schools can use their foodscapes to teach science.

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Matt is a proud St. Louis native with over ten years of farming and gardening experience. He got his start with farming as a Peace Corps volunteer in Paraguay, later going to study permaculture and work on several farms in Israel and Brooklyn, NY.  Then he became a practitioner and instructor on edible landscaping, organic agriculture, orcharding, and permaculture design.  He is most passionate about creating magical food moments in the everyday places we work, learn and play. 

His company Custom Foodscaping transforms ordinary spaces into beautiful, food-producing landscapes. They provide consultation, design, and installation services to create edible landscaping in your farm & garden. 

Visit www.urbanfarm.org/foodscaping for the show notes on this episode, and access to our full podcast library!

And, If you would like to support our podcast and let us know you appreciate the work that we do, please consider a monthly or one-time donation! Visit https://www.urbanfarm.org/support-the-podcast/ for more details.

478: Matt Lebon on Foodscaping

Sep 10, 2019

Conveying observations from the kitchen,
the dining room, and the garden
.

In This Podcast:

Journalism and food have been major themes all throughout Joe Yonan's life. In this podcast, learn about how he got involved with food at a very young age, his journey to food editor, and what a food editor actually does. Joe also shares about learning to homestead, succession planting, and what he's growing in his garden. He has written two cookbooks and edited another called “America The Great Cookbook,” don't tell anyone else, but we smell a book giveaway cooking!

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Joe is the Food and Dining editor of The Washington Post, supervising all food coverage in the features department. He is also the editor of "America The Great Cookbook" and has written two cookbooks “Eat Your Vegetables: Bold Recipes for the Single Cook” (2013) and “Serve Yourself: Nightly Adventures in Cooking for One" (2011).

Joe was a food writer and Travel section editor at the Boston Globe before moving to Washington in 2006 to edit The Post’s Food section. He writes The Post’s Weeknight Vegetarian column and for five years wrote the Cooking for One column, both of which have won honors from the Association of Food Journalists.

In addition to writing about food and dining, Joe also has written about his efforts to grow food on his 150-square-foot urban front yard.

Go to www.urbanfarm.org/joeyonan for more information and links on this podcast, and to find our other great guests.

477: Joe Yonan on Documenting the Culinary Experience

Sep 7, 2019

Inspiration through nature’s bounty of
nourishing plants.

In This Podcast: Working in a desk job and knowing that it was not a good fit, it still took Kimberly Kling a little while to build up the courage to do something different.  Eventually she found herself on a path to learning about herbalism and has finally found her passion. As a devoted learner, she is learning as much as she can, but still finds time to share with others what she has learned so far.

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Kimberly is an herbalist, mother, part-time homesteader, gardener, and the creatrix behind Joyful Roots, a botanical wellness brand. Kimberly and her family live on a 4-acre mini farm in a rural ranching town in Southern Arizona. She finds immense enjoyment in getting to know the local wild plants, experimenting with gardening, making art, creating with food and herbs, and exploring the land around her.

Through her business, Joyful Roots, her passions are channeled into to helping others cultivate their inner joy by amplifying their self-care rituals and growing deeper roots in our Mother Earth. Kimberly is committed to offering small batch, 100% natural body-care and soul-care products that nourish our bodies, respect the Earth, and empower us into greater well-being.

Go to www.urbanfarm.org/joyfulroots for links to her poem, and to a surprising recipe.

476: Kimberly Kling on the Impact of Herbs.

Sep 3, 2019

Farming for a local restaurant and a rapidly growing community.

In This Podcast: It was not a direct path to this destiny for David Barrow, but running a sustainable urban farm in Austin Texas has been his biggest success. With many regenerative and sustainable practices in use on the farm it is no wonder the soil is healthy and the crops are productive. Working hand-in-hand with a restaurant onsite allows for the freshest of dishes in a unique way. He shares some key aspects about how sustainable farming is working in East Austin.

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David is the Farm Manager for Eden East Farm in East Austin. After 18 years of working in the film industry, he began managing Eden East \and runs the farm in conjunction with a locally sourcing restaurant.

Eden East Farm is a sustainable urban farm sitting three miles from the state capital building. They grow over 65 varieties of produce throughout the year, and service restaurants and the public alike. Formerly Springdale Farm, the property has served the community for over 100 years in some sort of farming capacity.

Go to www.urbanfarm.org/edeneastfarm for more information and links on this podcast, and to find our other great guests.

475: David Barrow on
Sustainable Urban Farming in Texas

Aug 31, 2019

Taking an everyday vegetable to the table
in delicious new ways.

In This Podcast: 

After Amy Lacey’s health took a downturn and she wanted to bring some normalcy back to her family’s routine, she tried a recipe for a vegetable she did not really like. Little did she know how a bland vegetable could make such a difference for so many people. Combine that with her passion for doing good things and paying it forward, and she is truly making a delicious impact in the world.

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Amy is the author of Cali’flour Kitchen: 125 Cauliflower-Based Recipes for the Carbs You Crave. She is the co-founder and CEO of Cali’flour Foods, and her Cali’flour products have been featured in Food & Beverage Magazine, GQ, and OK! Magazine. They were also named one of “Whoopi’s Favorite Things” on The View; and won Clean Eating magazine’s Clean Choice Award two years in a row.

Go to www.urbanfarm.org/califlour for more information and links on this podcast, and to find our other great guests.

474: Amy Lacey on The very versatile cauliflower.

Aug 27, 2019

Expanded growing options through hydroponics.

In This Podcast: When Kevin Espiritu started gardening he quickly became interested in hydroponics, and as he tried to learn how, he found that most articles and books were focused on only one well-known plant and he wanted to grow food. He started documenting his experiences to help others, and now Kevin has several platforms to share information for new and beginning gardeners. Today he shares several tips about small space gardening, and how there is a way for anyone with a will. www.urbanfarm.org/epicgardening 

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Living in a condo in 2011, Kevin didn’t have the space for a big backyard soil-based garden, so he got creative. Learning about urban gardening was eye opening for Kevin and as a self-admitted geek and someone with an obsessive personality, he got hooked. Living in a condo in 2011, Kevin didn’t have the space for a big backyard soil-based garden, so he got creative. Learning about urban gardening was eye opening for Kevin and as a self-admitted geek and someone with an obsessive personality, he got hooked.  

He started building his own “bizarre” hydroponic systems with amazing results, and when his friends and family wanted to learn how to do the same – Kevin was in business.  Epic Gardening began as a way to present gardening information in a more modern, updated way. First, the website, next YouTube, a daily podcast, and then his Instagram, Facebook, and Pinterest presence. Kevin is the author of Field Guide to Urban Gardening from our friends at Quarto Publishing.

Go to www.urbanfarm.org/epicgardening for more information and links on this podcast, and to find our other great guests.

473: Kevin Espiritu on Small-Space Urban Gardens

Aug 24, 2019

Focusing on sustainable growing practices on 20-acres down under.

In This Podcast: We meet Angela Neyland as she tells us why an old TV comedy series influenced her and how she found permaculture. With this foundation, she shares the journey that led her and her husband to start a permaculture based homestead. She describes her property and some of the challenges they have overcome so far as well as her future plans for the property.

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Angela is an Australian 34-year-old mother and part-time university research officer who holds a PhD in Australian Aboriginal archaeology. She and her husband Danial own Loganberry Forest, a permaculture homestead in rural Victoria Australia where she recently started a small heirloom seed business for her homegrown seeds online.

Go to www.urbanfarm.org/loganberry for more information and links on this podcast, and to find our other great guests.

472: Angela Neyland on Permaculture Homesteading in Australia.

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